Impostor Syndrome: A Navigational Toolkit

https://www.flickr.com/photos/el_cajon_yacht_club/9335126935

Some years ago, I was lucky enough invited to a gathering of great and good people: artists and scientists, writers and discoverers of things. And I felt that at any moment they would realise that I didn’t qualify to be there, among these people who had really done things. On my second or third night there, I was standing at the back of the hall, while a musical entertainment happened, and I started talking to a very nice, polite, elderly gentleman about several things, including our shared first name. And then he pointed to the hall of people, and said words to the effect of, “I just look at all these people, and I think, what the heck am I doing here? They’ve made amazing things. I just went where I was sent.” And I said, “Yes. But you were the first man on the moon. I think that counts for something.” And I felt a bit better. Because if Neil Armstrong felt like an imposter, maybe everyone did. Maybe there weren’t any grown-ups, only people who had worked hard and also got lucky and were slightly out of their depth, all of us doing the best job we could, which is all we can really hope for.

-Neil Gaiman
From http://neil-gaiman.tumblr.com/post/160603396711/hi-i-read-that-youve-dealt-with-with-impostor

That anecdote illustrates just how pervasive impostor syndrome is, and that it even affects people outside of creative spheres. Both Gaiman & Armstrong are widely celebrated for achievements in their respective fields, so if they feel like impostors, it’s fair to say that nearly everyone falls victim to it at one point or another, no matter where you are in your career, no matter the industry. I’ll direct you to the insights of people much wiser and more experienced than myself, and hopefully this post will serve as a toolbox that you can pull from to hammer, chisel, drill, dynamite, or scream your way out of impostor syndrome episodes whenever they strike!

If you’re still not sure about what exactly impostor syndrome consists of, or have questions about its validity, this piece from Time Magazine is the perfect launchpad. Abigail Abrams runs through its origins and evolutions, references the psychology behind it, and pinpoints the personality types most likely to be affected. http://time.com/5312483/how-to-deal-with-impostor-syndrome/

Kirsten Weir conducted a thorough examination of impostor syndrome in graduate students for the American Psychological Association. While its primary focus is academia, this piece is loaded with information that can be applied regardless of the disciplines, industries, or institutions that have you feeling like an outsider. https://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud

This essay by Alicia Liu caught my eye because of a brilliant accompanying graphic, but the text surrounding it is just as exceptional. Liu details her experiences in programming, and has even written follow-ups (linked at the end of the original) to help guide others through the entire arc of impostor syndrome, including moving beyond it! https://medium.com/counter-intuition/overcoming-impostor-syndrome-bdae04e46ec5


https://medium.com/counter-intuition/overcoming-impostor-syndrome-bdae04e46ec5

Sometimes you feel like an impostor when things get more difficult, but Mary Robinette Kowal has a theory that might just set you back on track! http://maryrobinettekowal.com/journal/impostor-syndrome/

Unfortunately, impostor syndrome can strike twice for people of color, people with disabilities, LGBTQ and gender non-conforming people, and other marginalized folks. It’s an ugly truth that many establishments have a default of straight-white-cis-het-able-bodied-male rather than qualified. Mario Montoya runs down what it’s like to be othered in an already anxiety-inducing MFA program. http://bmr.unm.edu/2018/11/07/double-impostor-syndrome-being-of-color-in-an-mfa-program/

Afrofuturism! Music! Academia! The power of imagination! What do these things have to do with impostor syndrome? Inda Lauryn lays it all out in this transformative personal essay at The Toast. http://the-toast.net/2014/11/19/afrofuturism-imagination-impostor-syndrome/

Working behind the scenes at Simon & Schuster, Janelle Milanes saw that the reality of publishing wasn’t as daunting as it often appears. In this interview with Vivian Nunez, she discusses impostor syndrome, her Latinx heritage, and how to create a space for your work. https://www.forbes.com/sites/viviannunez/2018/12/14/this-latina-young-adult-author-shares-how-she-navigates-impostor-syndrome/#16752ed9135d

Sci-Fi writer John Scalzi maps out the other side of the coin: a potentially infuriating glimpse into the life of a successful writer who’s never experienced impostor syndrome. He explores the privileges that carried him along the way, but also acknowledges that when you are a writer, you are a writer, no matter what anyone else’s perceptions or opinions may be. https://whatever.scalzi.com/2016/01/30/impostor-syndrome-or-not/

Still need a boost to get you out of the impostor bog? Sonia Thompson is here with motivation, understanding, and a little help from Maya Angelou, Seth Godin, and Tina Fey. https://writetodone.com/how-to-keep-writing-2/

If that wasn’t your speed, try this shouty, sweary explosion of impostor syndrome-checking inspirational hellfire in that only Chuck Wendig could conjure! http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2016/03/01/please-let-me-motivate-you-with-my-gesticulations-and-screams/

Last but not least, a gift from Kythryne Aisling to take with you on your journey.https://wyrdingstudios.com/blogs/news/83774788-fighting-impostor-syndrome-or-how-to-be-a-real-artist

Dear creative person, go forth and create!

Take a Breath, Get Inspired

If you’ve found yourself in a creative slump and are coming up short on ideas, or at least any worthy of pursuit, this is the post for you! In these situations, I recommend curating a space to recharge and be inspired. Here are some essays, albums, podcasts, and more that have been getting me ramped up to create so far this year!

The Day Job series
In this essay series on Medium, writers run down the details of toiling to make ends meet while writing books in their off time. These are must reads for anyone working a day job to support a dream!
https://medium.com/s/day-job?fbclid=IwAR3KrvfR1vb29DAS9eZ2UaSp0GhDlW7_krLtLIiv9SCCfmfc7lbDTy7MFX8

Ursula K. Le Guin’s Daily Routine
“Some of us are Norman Mailer, but others of us are middle-aged Portland housewives.” Here’s an opportunity for those who can dedicate full days to creative work to try out the writing schedule of a master! Personally, I see it as both aspiration and inspiration.
http://www.openculture.com/2019/01/ursula-k-le-guins-daily-routine-the-discipline-that-fueled-her-imagination.html

Ditch Diggers – Drinks with an Agent
On the latest episode of my favorite lit-adjacent podcast, Mur Lafferty sits down and, you guessed it, has drinks with her agent, Jen Udden! I’m always up for any insights a literary agent is willing to share, and this episode does not disappoint!
https://murverse.com/ditch-diggers-74-drinks-with-an-agent/

Yugen Blakrok – Anima Mysterium
I read the Bandcamp Daily feature about this album and, while intrigued, I was in no way prepared for how much I’d enjoy it. It delivers on the promise of a sprawling sci-fi excursion, but it’s so much more. Tripped out, down-tempo sonic atmospheres swirl around cosmic but truthful, potent, and (just like the best sci-fi) relevant lyrics, weaving an engaging listen that I can’t stop going back to. And that closing track? Read the lyrics while listening and try not to visualize the perfect scene to kick off your next masterpiece!

So I wear this cloak of raven feathers, holding a scepter
As letters from the ether fall like rain when I rip deserts
Welcome to the land of gray
Where troubles never cease, and man’s awakening is accompanied by grief

From “Land of Gray”

Stream Anima Mysterium on Spotify or Apple Music, or buy the album on Bandcamp!

Voyage to the Stars
Here’s a completely different take on the cosmos! This new podcast with Colton Dunn, Felicia Day, Janet Varney, and Steve Berg is an interstellar comedy about a group of underdogs stumbling into unfathomable situations. Not only is it hilarious and absurd in all the best ways, but all of the dialogue is improvised! The framework of the storyline is in place, but it’s on the actors to keep it progressing and make it fun. Though it feels like a nice escape, it’s also a great study in character creation and dialogue. This is an Earwolf show, so you’ll find it on the podcast app of your choice.
https://www.earwolf.com/show/voyage-to-the-stars/

Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj
While the news cycle can feel inescapable, Hasan Minhaj’s Netflix show focuses more on the often obscured issues and root causes behind the big news stories. New episodes premier weekly, but due to the format you won’t feel behind if you don’t watch as soon as they drop. Minhaj is a sharp host and undeniable comic force, which alone would make for a great show, but he also manages to break down complex situations with a dose of humanity. Even if your work is not overtly sociopolitical, you will certainly benefit from the show’s fresh perspectives and investigative nature, not to mention the plethora of ideas on how to torture your characters from the governments and corporations who do it best! Check out a preview and watch on Netflix.
https://www.netflix.com/title/80239931

Low – Double Negative
This album sounds like nuclear winter. Like everything’s changed. It sounds like the last swarm of bees. It sounds like breaking down. Structures and infrastructures, industries and societies, emotions and mental faculties, all breaking down. Collapse. It sounds like the collapse. Like the Doomsday Clock melting. All precedents are annihilated and you don’t know what’s coming next. It sounds like a warp through time and space, but feels distinctly present.

Low – Double Negative

Double Negative came out last year, but I can’t say I’ve ever heard anything quite like it and it continues to bloom, each listen dusting me in a new sensation of panic or discomfort or uncertainty or serenity. While it doesn’t stray far from the slow, deliberate movements that Low has come to embody, it also takes new compositional risks and melds them with bold production to construct something larger and far more affecting than just a collection of songs. This record is nothing short of striking, and if you’re in need of something new to shake you out of old cycles, this is that something. Low has been around for over twenty-five years, so for them to create something this unique and potent at this stage is itself inspirational. If nothing else, listen and try writing a description of what you’re hearing and feeling—that’s a writing exercise in itself!
Stream it on Spotify or Apple Music, buy it on Bandcamp!

Zeal & Ardor – Stranger Fruit
Can you tell music is my go-to when I need some direction? Stranger Fruit is another release from last year, but I just can’t shake it. Zeal & Ardor is the brainchild of Manuel Gagneux, and seeks to answer an odd, genre-crunching question: what would slave spirituals sound like in the context of black metal? The answer, under Gagneux’s capable guidance, is, well … fucking incredible. While the previous two releases were eye-opening and enjoyable, Stranger Fruit is the most fully-realized yet. It’s the perfect soundtrack for you genre-hopping, interstitial types looking for new ways to blend seemingly disparate elements into something fresh, using tropes as pole vaults instead of borders.
Stream the album with your preferred service or purchase here!

Wondering why there are no books on this list? Check out my previous post, “Reading for Writing!” Additionally, I’ve found I’m too easily influenced by other writers when I’m struggling with ideas, and prefer to reach outside the medium. If you need to read to write (not uncommon!), I suggest starting outside of your preferred genres. Keep your expectations tempered and your mind open, you just might discover new ways to tell stories that you’d never considered!

Has something helped you get out of a funk recently? I want to hear about it!

(Note: We do not benefit from sharing links to purchase any of the works mentioned here, I just think they’re worth buying!)

A Crash Course in Time Management

Hands down, my greatest weakness when it comes to creative ventures is time management. I usually have at least two projects underway at any given moment and am always plotting at least one more, but I rarely complete any of them in a timely manner. Yes, I work full time on top of these passion projects, but I should still have some time left over to focus on making stuff, right?

On average, I work eight or nine hours a day and sleep about seven, so that’s sixteen out of twenty-four hours down the drain right from the start. Yes, that’s a lot of lost time, but that still leaves eight hours to carve out time to create. Oh, to have eight full hours a day to work on ANYTHING! You and I both know that’s not a likely scenario. What about making and eating dinner? The dog’s getting restless, time for a walk. Dishes are piling up, laundry needs done, gotta get to the grocery store, have some bills to sort out, oh and how about we avoid alienating everyone important in our lives? Eight hours becomes about an hour divided into inconvenient intervals just like that, and I don’t even have kids! Creative parents, I don’t know how you do it, and I salute you.

Now that we’ve identified how precious and fleeting our time is, we need to make some adjustments and mold an itinerary that works for us. A few years back, my work schedule changed from a 6:00 AM start time to 8:00 AM, and I decided I’d just keep getting up around 5:00 and try to utilize that uncluttered morning-brain to work on writing and editing. I was already on the schedule, so it didn’t feel like a seismic shift in my day to day, but it made a massive impact on my productivity, and I still get up way too early every work day. Well… almost every work day. I’ve never been a morning person, but I was surprised to find out how much I’m able to accomplish in this seemingly insignificant window. I highly recommend adding an hour to your morning routine if you find yourself struggling with deadlines or project completions If not for these morning sessions, I think my LetterWorks associates would’ve kicked me to the curb for not keeping up with the workload!

That’s a little over one hour per day that I’ve wrangled for myself, but I still needed more. I started reading time management tips and blogs, and decided to look into auditing my time. I downloaded the Toggl app and have been dutifully logging my activities for about a week now. It seems strange to record everything you do over the course of the day, but since I always have my phone handy, I can update it as an alternative to checking social media. This comes with the added bonus of sparing myself the shot of existential dread from watching society collapse in real time, so it’s already worth it! I haven’t logged my social media use specifically, but using the Screen Time app, I’ve got a few hours per week that I could at very least use for reading, organizing, or otherwise planning something related to my creative endeavors. If you’re interested in auditing your time but don’t think an app is right for you, here’s a handy printable chart you can use!

As expected, the majority of my pie chart is eaten by work and sleep, but I do have moments here and there to lock into tasks that don’t require the full focus of editing or writing, like catching up on emails. I’ve squeaked in time between getting ready for work and actually leaving (fifteen minutes on Monday!), while dinner is cooking, and then of course in the evening after my other life-essential tasks are done.

You may find as I did, that evenings are not as easy to schedule productivity into as I had assumed. There are the usual day to day activities, but then we also have our loved ones to consider. I have no desire to just abandon my girlfriend between dinner and bedtime, and generally will not unless I have a pressing deadline. I can, however, work on layout, website updates, project promotion, writing emails, or other mission-adjacent tasks when we sit down to watch TV. This doesn’t always happen, but as I continue to monitor my time usage, I get better at spotting windows like this that I can utilize.

Another thing I’ve discovered is that simply scheduling and logging time doesn’t always lead to results. In these cases, I’ve been careful to note what variables are at play so I can try to either plan around them or prepare for them in the event that I can’t reschedule. Sometimes this means skipping an early morning session in favor of sleep after a particularly long or grueling day at work.

Setting goals for each session has been helpful as well. Whether I set a word or page count for a specified period of time, or set a time limit to complete a task, I find that goals are good motivators. This would’ve been utter speculation had I attempted it before keeping track of my productivity, but now I have an idea how long it takes me to write and edit a blog post, or how much of a magazine layout I can get done in an hour. And speaking of motivators, logging milestones and completed projects is a great way to see that you’re making progress and your efforts are paying off!

Here are some helpful links to get you off and running with your own personalized time management regimen!

https://observer.com/2015/06/how-to-be-efficient-dan-arielys-6-new-secrets-to-managing-your-time/
This one is particularly helpful to anyone feeling like society is conspiring to hijack our free time.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnrampton/2018/05/01/manipulate-time-with-these-powerful-20-time-management-tips/#5f72a4c757ab
This Forbes article caters more to the business-minded than creative types, but still contains some solid points. Plus, most writers are basically one-person businesses!

https://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/making-time-to-write-time-management-for-screenwriters
Here’s one for screenwriters, but applies to anyone looking to string more words together.

https://toggl.com/time-management-tips/
The aforementioned app, Toggl has some ideas on how it should be done as well.

I’ll leave you with some words of wisdom from the always fantastic Kameron Hurley:

“Time management has been high on my list of things to fix this year, and if I was going to get all the work done that I needed to get done, something had to go. That something was engaging with the internet. When people pop into my Twitter mentions now with a passive-aggressive response or angry point of disagreement, I just mute them. Folks forget that they are talking to a Real Human Being here, with a shitbrick of work to do and no time for their nonsense. I’ve reminded myself over and over this year that the purpose of most abuse you get online for speaking your mind (especially if you don’t present as a Generic White Dude), is done to steal your time. People want to wear you down, to break you, to silence you. And in order to keep working, I’ve had to make some changes to how I interact (or not) in online spaces. Most of the bloviating circle-jerking stuff is just not worth my time. I engage when it matters, not just in reaction to somebody being dumb and wanting me to waste my time bloviating a “response” to something patently ridiculous like “women shouldn’t vote” or “periods make women dumb.” I’m too fucking busy getting shit done over here.”

Source: https://www.kameronhurley.com/the-calm-before-the-storm/

Winter 2019 Submission Roundup!

Welcome to 2019! I don’t suppose anyone out there has resolved to publish a story this year, or more stories than last year? Anyone? I knew there’d be a few of you! Whether you’re here because of a resolution or not, if you’re looking to publish your work, you’ve come to the right place. Kick off the new year by getting your work into some of these respectable, and often paying publications!

As with our last roundup, I have not listed any magazines that charge a submission fee but don’t pay for acceptances. I may sound like a broken record, but perhaps this will become my catch phrase: “If they’re making money on your art, you should be making money on your art.”

Never, never, never, EVER submit anything without fully reading and understanding those submission guidelines first! If you’re unsure, ask for clarification via email. Some guidelines are very dense, but most editors would much rather respond to a quick email question than spend time reading something that doesn’t qualify for publication. Might I also recommend my post on making the cut with journal submissions as a fine companion for your approaching submission mission.

Godspeed! Read the guidelines!

Paying markets with no fees

Lackington’s: Outstanding speculative fiction, currently open for the “Voyages” themed issue. 1 cent CAD per word. This was featured in our last roundup and is still open, so assemble your best voyage ASAP! https://lackingtons.com/submissions/

Apex Magazine: Apex is a long-time standout in genre fiction. They publish sci-fi, fantasy, horror, speculative fiction, and genre-defying work by some of the best writers out there. Payment is $.06 per word, and there’s a chance that they’ll podcast your piece for an additional $.01 per word. There’s no specified deadline, so they will likely close soon! https://www.apex-magazine.com/submission-guidelines/

Rattle: This well-known poetry magazine is looking for poems that first appeared on Instagram, and they’re paying $100 per piece! This opportunity ends on January 15th, so get on this one soon! https://rattle.submittable.com/submit/28742/instagram-poets

Great Weather for MEDIA: Accepting “edgy, fearless, and experimental” pieces for it’s annual anthology. Contributors earn $10 and 1 contributor copy, open until January 15thhttps://greatweatherformedia.submittable.com/submit

Ruminate: A beautiful publication rooted in healing contemplation, Ruminate pays $20 per page of poetry up to $80, $20 per 400 words of prose, and $20 for visual art. Submission cycles vary, so get your poetry in by January 15th and non-fiction by May 31st. Fiction submissions will be open from February 19th-August 14thhttps://www.ruminatemagazine.com/pages/submissions

Prairie Fire: Traditionally styled, but creatively energized, Prairie Fire is looking for work-related stories for their “Work Matters” issue. Fiction and non-fiction earn $.10 per word up to $250, $40 per poem. Deadline: January 18thhttp://www.prairiefire.ca/submit/submission-guidelines/current-submission-calls/call-for-submissions-work-matters/

FIYAH: If you’re not familiar with this magazine of Black speculative fiction, get familiar, because these folks are not here to mess around! FIYAH pays $150 for short stories, $300 for novelettes, and $50 for poetry. The theme for this issue is “Hair” and submissions close on January 31sthttps://www.fiyahlitmag.com/submissions/

Event: One of Canada’s finest! Paying $30 per page up to $500 of prose, and $35 per page of poetry up to $500. Deadline: January 31st. https://www.eventmagazine.ca/submit/

Augur Magazine: This newer Canadian magazine has hit the ground running. They’re looking for pieces that defy easy genre categorization, but lean towards literary speculative fiction. Their target is to publish 75% Canadian and Indigenous artists, so while all are welcome to submit, local creators will have some preference. $.06 cents per word for short fiction, $60 for flash, and $40 per poem—all payment in CAD. Deadline January 31st http://www.augurmag.com/submissions/

Room: Another Canadian gem, this time Room is looking for a new take on “Sports” for their upcoming themed issue. Accepted pieces will earn $50-150 CAD depending on length. Submissions open until January 31sthttp://roommagazine.com/submit

Arc: Long-running poetry journal offering up $50 per page plus a contributor copy. Get your lines in by January 31sthttp://arcpoetry.ca/submit/

Ninth Letter: This University of Illinois publication is a standout in the sea of university journals. The pieces and layout design are always top-notch, and they publish a wide variety of work. The print edition pays $25 per printed page up to $150, plus two contributor copies. Submissions of fiction, poetry, and essays accepted by February 28thhttps://ninthletteronline.submittable.com/submit

Zyzzyva: Beautiful, reputable magazine. No online submissions, snail mail only! Token to semi-pro rates. Open January 7th-May 31st. http://www.zyzzyva.org/about/submissions/

The Deaf Poets Society: Not to be biased, but this might be my favorite new magazine! This digital multimedia platform publishes deaf and disabled artists, and is on the forefront of media accessibility. They’re running on donations, so payment amounts depend on gifts from fans and donors. No submission deadlineshttps://www.deafpoetssociety.com/submit/

The Masters Review: This is a big time mag known for its massive contests, but now they’re open year round and paying $.10 per word up to $200 for fiction and non-fiction by writers who have yet to release a book-length work. This is a great jump start for you up-and-comers! https://themastersreview.submittable.com/submit/26106/new-voices-free

Pseudopod: Hear your fiction in podcast form! Very cool and forward-thinking fiction podcast looking for dark, weird fiction. 6 cents per word, Rolling deadlinehttp://pseudopod.org/submissions/

Nashville Review: One of only a handful of university journals on this list, traditional format with a refreshing approach. $25 per poem, $100 for prose. Now accepting translations! January 31st deadline. https://as.vanderbilt.edu/nashvillereview/contact/submit

One Story: Exactly like it sounds, a slick magazine featuring a single piece of fiction! Acceptance gets you $500 and 25 contributor copies, so have your best, most polished work ready for this one. Open from January 15th-May 31st. https://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit&pubcode=os

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet: This is the best lit mag you’ve (probably) never read! A true gem by the fine folks at Small Beer Press. No online submissions—snail mail only! 3 cents per word with a $25 minimum for fiction, $10 per poem, plus two contributor copies and a discount on additional issues. http://smallbeerpress.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Beneath Ceaseless Skies: They publish a very specific style of fantasy, but they do it very well. Now publishing stories up to 15,000 words at 6 cents per word, rolling submissions. http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/submissions/

Smokelong Quarterly: Flash fiction only, no deadlines. $25 per story. http://www.smokelong.com/submissions/guidelines/

No fee, no pay

Ink & Nebula: Interesting new digital poetry mag that highlights established poets on the “Ink” side, and features previously unpublished poets on the “Nebula” side. Submit up to 5 pieces by February 1sthttp://inkandnebula.com/submissions.html

The Account: Here’s a magazine carving its own space into the digital realm! The Account is looking to explore the relationship between the words on the page, and the ideas that led the writer to those words. Each submission must be accompanied by an account of writing that submission (Read the guidelines!!!). Deadline: March 1sthttps://theaccountmagazine.com/guidelines

Crab Fat Magazine: Crab Fat might just be the hardest working non-paying magazine going. They consistently put out solid issues, plus a yearly print anthology. This is a great place cut your teeth in the lit world with the best new talents! Rolling deadlinehttp://crabfatmagazine.com/

Always Crashing: Looking for something different? You found it! Always Crashing is an ever-mutating multimedia entity that also publishes a print issue annually. No deadline listed. https://www.alwayscrashing.com/submissions/

The Wax Paper: A quarterly print broadsheet style publication inspired by “Studs” Terkel? Of course that sounds awesome! Submit by June 30th, accepted artists will get a lifetime subscription. https://thewaxpaper.com/submissions/

Asymptote: Bring your translations here! Rolling deadlinehttps://www.asymptotejournal.com/submit/

Small fee, paid publication

Witness: Brought to you by the Black Mountain Institute (who also publish The Believer), Witness is looking for innovative poetry, prose, and photography with a unique perspective. Payment is $25 for every 1,500 words, and $25 per poem and they charge a $3 Submittable fee. Submissions are open from January 15th-March 1st. https://witness.blackmountaininstitute.org/submit/

Zizzle: Flash fiction that appeals to all ages. $100 per piece with a $3 submission fee. Accepting submissions year-round. http://zizzlelit.com/submit/

Ploughshares: You’ve heard of this one, right? $3 fee, $45 per printed page with a $90 minimum and a $450 max. Deadline: January 15th. https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Driftwood: A fairly young journal coming into its own. Fees from $2.99, pays $15 per poem, $75 for fiction. Rolling deadline. https://www.driftwoodpress.net/submit

There are more lit mags than I could ever hope to list here, so if there’s one you like that’s open for subs, drop it in the comments! And read the damn submission guidelines!!!

Rising Above the Noise: Writing Social/Political Commentary

We’re all painfully aware of the inexhaustible barrage of social and political commentary these days, thanks to the 24-hour news cycle and social media buzzing like starved flies around a cesspool of absurd political chaos and indefensible partisan posturing. Sometimes you just want to get away from it all and write about gumdrop fairies and unicorns dancing on rainbows, and while that’s perfectly fine, that’s not the objective here today.

You may ask yourself, “why bother?” If social or political writing consisted solely of punditry and opinion pieces, I’d be right there with you. Unless you are bringing something completely revolutionary to the table, pursuing straight commentary at this point will all but guarantee you’ll be lost in the shuffle. Fiction with a political or social bent, however, allows plenty of space to say your piece and offer new angles on situations most assume have been wholly explored. A special piece of art can change the world, and the most impactful art tends to draw from the world around us. Luckily, writers have numerous methods that can stir readers’ consciousness without preaching or force-feeding a set of preconfigured ideals.

We’ve all read something that feels less like a story or conversation and becomes a diatribe that strikes the wrong nerve and sets an uncomfortable tone. Once a reader reaches that point, there’s rarely any turning back. The one major exception here is satire. That said, satire is one of the most difficult genres to get right, but the payoff is by far the most rewarding. If you’ve got a satirical piece materializing, make sure you go back and re-read Jonathan Swift’s legendary “A Modest Proposal” one more time to ensure your grasp of the form is firm. Swift’s convictions are steadfast, but instead of pounding his readers over the head in an attempt to force compassion, he challenges us to reckon with a ludicrous darkness and find our own way to the message.

One of the biggest challenges to writing a timely commentary is that it can come with a giant expiration date, but using allegory avoids a head-on collision with overt hot topics. Like satire, allegory can be hard to pull off without irony or being too obvious, but again, you can weave a very rewarding tale with enough work and the right vision. Think of allegory as a metaphorical narrative, in which you tell the story as directly or indirectly as you like, but masking the actual details with characters, settings, and events that don’t have any clear correlation with the underlying narrative. For the most basic examples, think Aesop’s Fables. For something that goes a little deeper, try George Orwell’s Animal Farm.

For a less restrictive foray, take a stab at genre fiction. I know science fiction and fantasy (SFF) have long been the poster children for escapism, often denounced as being universally unimportant or just for kids, but just in case you were unaware, people who make these sweeping judgments could not be more wrong. Several classic novels are now categorized as literary fiction, even though they are SFF: 1984, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Farenheit 451 are just the tip of the iceberg. In more recent years, “speculative fiction” has risen to prominence as a division of SFF that leans more socially conscious and forward thinking, with writers like N.K. Jemisin, Jeff Vandermeer, Nnedi Okorafor, and many others forging a strong path.

With SFF, you can write direct representations of reality filtered through alien characters or situations, and while your audience will (hopefully) pick up what you’re throwing down, you won’t be stuffing it down their throats, and they’ll be all the happier for it.
If this style of genre fiction simply doesn’t suit you, just extract your subject and inject it into an unexpected place. This way you have more freedom than you would within an allegory, but you still have an interesting structure to build on. If you have a raging diatribe about the current administration, shift to a setting with lower or considerably different stakes, like a family owned theme park, a corner store, underground snake wrestling club, or whatever you see fit.
Whichever direction you take with your sociopolitical work, begin with a clear, original, truthful stance. Write with honesty and integrity, respect your readers’ intelligence, and don’t tell them what to think—show them what happens when characters think in certain ways.

You’re Not Alone: NaNoWriMo Support

Embarking on NaNoWriMo is daunting from the jump, but fear not! There are plenty of resources for everyone from first timers to seasoned vets, and there are more popping up each year. No matter how far along you are or what’s holding you up, there’s a solution out there to get you to the finish line.

NaNoWriMo.org

This is home base for NaNo warriors, chock full of resources that you may already be aware of, but there’s so much here that some of the essentials can get lost in the shuffle. Here are some direct links:

Pep Talks – Pep talks written by well-known authors delivered right to your inbox.
Regions – Meet other like-minded participants in your area to help each other through.
Word-Count Helpers – Track your progress and share milestones.
Forums – Everything from motivators to a place to unwind, be sure not to spend more time chatting than writing!

Camp NaNoWriMo

Camp NaNoWriMo is the very definition of community for NaNo participants, featuring counselors and coaches, forums, and badges to celebrate your milestones. Use your nanowrimo.org account to sign in!

@NaNoWordSprints

For something a little different, pop over to Twitter and join a scheduled word sprint run by NaNo volunteers.

The LetterWorks

While you’re here, we’ve written a handful of NaNo help guides on a variety of subjects:

November Events
Making The Most of NaNoWriMo
30 Days in the Trenches: Staying Motivated During NaNoWriMo
Writing Past the Wall
Let it Rest.

WikiWriMo

Have a question about anything NaNo related? Chances are you’ll find your answer here.

 

With these resources at your disposal, you can win NaNoWriMo!

Ask An Editor

As a writer, you have questions. It’s in your nature, so why fight it? Here are some of the most frequent questions posed to editors!

How do I get published?

This is definitely the number one question I hear as an editor, and there’s no simple answer, so strap in. If you’re not choosy about where you want to be published, it’s pretty easy these days. There are more literary magazines than I’ll ever be able to count, and each one has its own standards and methods of selecting work. Frankly, I’ve seen work I considered unpublishable grace the pages of quite a few digital lit mags, so if you can slap together a moderately cohesive story and email it to the right place, you could be a published author in no time!

There’s a similar trajectory for self-published books, which has given them a less than savory reputation, despite a handful of passionate, talented writers who utilize the format to avoid book industry runarounds. If you can finish a book, you can publish it cheap, but there’s no telling whether anyone will actually buy or read the thing.

Now, if you want to write a book that a reputable publishing house will release, or a story that a notable magazine will print, you’re going to have more work ahead of you. You will likely spend more time editing than you did writing the first draft, and then there’s the process of bringing in beta readers and editors, then querying publishers or submitting to magazines. Amanda has written an extremely helpful post that lines out the basic steps that you will take on your journey:

Eleven Steps to Becoming a Published Author by Amanda Wayne

Once you have a manuscript that can ascend to the echelon of major publication, you can also try to secure an agent. Agents are a writer’s best bet for bypassing book industry gatekeepers and placing your manuscript into the right hands. They usually take around a 15% fee, but if they can lock you into a deal with a major publisher, it’s usually worth it. Querying agents is a subject for another post entirely, and fortunately Catherine has run down some of the details here:

The Big Book Proposal Part One by Catherine Foster

What’s the deal with “show, don’t tell?”

Which do you enjoy reading more: a fast-paced crime caper, or the instruction manual for your television? This is “show, don’t tell” at its most basic. Telling is essentially listing the mundane details that most readers already understand, or don’t care about, where as showing puts the reader into the action, informs the feel of the scene, and lets them fill in the blanks with their imaginations. Like any other piece of writing advice, this is a suggestion, not a hard rule. While there are many specific instances in which you will need to break down and lay out some exposition, more often than not, your writing will be more effective if you let your characters show your readers what they’re up to.

Do I really need an editor? Can’t anyone be an editor?


via GIPHY

I get it, some folks think anyone who can operate spell check on their word processor can be an editor. While that might technically be true, a good editor does so much more than line up your grammar, fix typos, and correct spelling errors. Depending on when we are brought into a project, we may help with character development, plotting, overall flow, and sometimes brainstorming if an idea isn’t working and solutions are hard to find. We embed ourselves in the tone of each piece and, like literary chameleons, adopt the author’s voice, ensuring our edits will not stand out from the surrounding text. Essentially, we’re here for you. Whatever your project calls for, editors have the skills to work with you and make it the best it can be!

What’s the most common problem editors see in writing?

Beyond the usual grammar nitpicking, there are many other elements we’re on the lookout for, but I think passive voice is probably the most common. To be fair, it’s not always an issue, which makes it tricky! But what is it? Passive voice occurs when you make the object of an action the subject of the sentence, rather than the performer of said action. Suppose your character is playing soccer. Writing “the ball was kicked by Josh” is passive. Read that out loud. It sounds a little clumsy, doesn’t it? “Josh kicked the ball” is more direct and natural. This is a frequent problem when writing in past tense, so stay vigilant and watch out for objects leading the action!

Here are a few more common issues to watch for:
Adverb overuse
Tense shifts
Word choice and repetition

How long does editing take? How much does it cost?

This varies from editor to editor, but we make it easy. Right on our homepage, you’ll find our hourly rates for projects over 2,500 words, and hour per word rates for anything up to 2,500 words. The latter also comes with a two week guarantee, and we will work with you and set a deadline for longer projects before we begin!

In addition, these posts by Catherine are extremely helpful if you’re looking for more in-depth exploration of some of the topics I covered above:

What Kind of Editor Is Right For You? By Catherine Foster 

Can You Afford A High Quality Editor? (The Answer Might Surprise You) by Catherine Foster

Have questions we didn’t answer? Drop them in the comments and we’ll address them in a future post!

Fall 2018 Submission Roundup!

Hello, word-slingers! Are you ready to get your work out there to the unprepared populace? If you answered with any apprehension, we’re here for you—check our homepage for editing services and rates, and we’ll help you get your work into such good shape that you’ll be itching to send it out!

For those of you who are ready, those of you who just shouted “YES!” at your computer or mobile device, you’re in luck, as I’ve assembled and organized a collection of the most promising opportunities going. Some of these deadlines are coming up quick, so be vigilant. Please note that I have not listed any magazines that charge a submission fee but don’t pay for acceptances. I strongly suggest you avoid venues using this practice. If they’re making money on your art, you should be making money on your art.

Before you begin, and I can’t stress this enough, be sure to carefully read all guidelines before submitting anywhere! You may also be interested in reading my post on making the cut with journal submissions before you proceed.

Happy submitting, and don’t forget to read the guidelines!

Paying markets with no fees

Apex: “Do Not Go Quietly” socially conscious SFF anthology by some of the hardest working folks in genre fiction! 6 cents per word. Deadline: September 19th. https://apexbookcompany.moksha.io/publication/do-not-go-quietly/guidelines

Electric Literature: These icons of modern lit are open for a couple of weeks in two categories, so act fast! $100 total for selected poetry and graphic narrative work. Deadline September 20th. An essay on the book (or other narrative media) that almost killed you pays $60, with a deadline of September 21st. https://electricliterature.submittable.com/submit

The Puritan: Sleek Canadian magazine offering $20 per poem, $75 for fiction, $100 per essay, review, or interview. Deadline: September 25th. https://puritan-magazine.submittable.com/submit

Cosmic Roots & Eldritch Shores: Interesting and fun SFF journal, paying 6 cents per word. Submissions open September 21-28. https://cosmicrootsandeldritchshores.com/submissions/

Life After All: “An apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic/pastoral apocalyptic LGBTQIA+ anthology.” $150 per piece, open until September 30th. https://www.lessthanthreepress.com/anthology-submissions/

Pseudopod: Hear your fiction in podcast form in the “Artemis Rising” horror event for women only! Very cool and forward-thinking fiction podcast. 6 cents per word, September 30th deadline. http://pseudopod.org/2018/08/15/artemis-rising-5/#more-7276

Nashville Review: One of only a handful of university journals on this list, traditional format with a refreshing approach. $25 per poem, $100 for prose. Now accepting translations! September 30th deadline. https://as.vanderbilt.edu/nashvillereview/contact/submit

Event: One of Canada’s finest! $30 per page of prose, $35 per page of poetry. Deadline: September 30th. https://www.eventmagazine.ca/submit/

Consequence: A magazine with a special  interest in the “culture and consequences of war.” $25 per page of poetry, $10 per prose page, $15 per translated page. Deadline: September 30th. http://www.consequencemagazine.org/submit/

Bubble Off Plumb: An off-kilter anthology of the odd and unsettling. 3 cents per word + royalty share. Deadline: September 30th. https://feralcatpublishers.com/bubble-off-plumb-anthology

Spoon Knife 4: A Neurodivergent Guide to Spacetime: Anthology on time and space “with themes of neurodivergence, queerness, and/or the intersections of neurodivergence and queerness.” 1 cent per word. Deadline: September 30th. http://autpress.com/2018/01/call-for-submissions-spoon-knife-4/

Tin House: One of the big ones, and they’ve extended their submission window to October 15th! Rates start at $50 for poetry and $200 for prose. https://tinhouse.submittable.com/submit

Fireside Fiction: One of the best magazines going! Top-scale pay, short reading periods. $100 per poem, open October 24-31. 12.5 cents per word for fiction, open December 15-31. https://firesidefiction.com/submissions

One Story: Exactly like it sounds, a slick magazine featuring a single piece of fiction! Acceptance gets you $500 and 25 contributor copies, so have your best, most polished work ready for this one. Deadline: November 14th. https://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit&pubcode=os

Zyzzyva: Beautiful, reputable magazine. No online submissions, snail mail only! Token to semi-pro rates. Deadline: November 19th. http://www.zyzzyva.org/about/submissions/

Lackington’s: Outstanding speculative fiction, opens December 2018 for “Voyages” themed issue. 1 cent CAD per word. https://lackingtons.com/submissions/

Zizzle: Flash fiction that appeals to all ages. $100 per piece. December 31st deadline. http://zizzlelit.com/submit/

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet: A true gem by the fine folks at Small Beer Press! No online submissions—snail mail only! 3 cents per word for fiction, $10 per poem. http://smallbeerpress.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Beneath Ceaseless Skies: They publish a very specific style of fantasy, but they do it very well. 6 cents per word, rolling submissions. http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/submissions/

Smokelong Quarterly: Flash fiction only, no deadlines. $25 per story. http://www.smokelong.com/submissions/guidelines/

No fee, no pay

Bridge: Cool opportunity for young writers and artists, as this magazine is only open only to contributors between the ages of 14 & 24. Contributor copy payment, deadline: September 30th. https://bridgebluffton.submittable.com/submit

Feels Blind Literary: Inaugural issue, looks promising, but they need exceptional work to put them on the map! Deadline: October 1st. https://www.feelsblindliterary.com/submissions

Capulet: Another opportunity for the young folks, open to women ages 15-29. October 20th deadline. http://capuletmag.com/submit/

Clockhouse: “An eclectic conversation about the work-in-progress of life.” Payment is a contributor copy, but it’s likely to be a good one. Deadline: December 1. http://clockhouse.net/main/submit/

Litro: Wide-ranging UK journal open for various themed issues—check specific guidelines posted for each one! https://www.litro.co.uk/submit/

Storm Cellar: One of the more engaging indie publications currently out there, rolling submission period. https://stormcellarquarterly.com/submit/

Loud Zoo: The socially conscious literary/arts journal from our sister company, Bedlam Publishing. Every accepted piece gets a complimentary edit from The LetterWorks! Deadline: September 30th, not accepting poetry this cycle. http://www.bedlampublishing.com/submissions.html

Small fee, paid publication

Nimrod: Ambitious journal open for a themed issue on the Middle East and North Africa. $3 fee, $10 per page up to $200. Deadline: December 1st. https://nimrod.utulsa.edu/manuscripts.html

Ploughshares: You’ve heard of this one, right? $3 fee, $45 per printed page with a $90 minimum and a $450 max. Deadline: January 15th. https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Driftwood: A fairly young journal coming into its own. Fees from $2.99, pays $15 per poem, $75 for fiction. Rolling deadline. https://www.driftwoodpress.net/submit

 

See anything I missed that deserves a mention? Drop it in the comments! And read the damn submission guidelines!!!

Behind the Book: All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows by Ramez Qureshi (Part 2)

This is the second in a two-part series. if you missed part 1, click here!

Welcome back! Last month I promised I’d get down and dirty with prepress details and insights when working with traditional print houses. Depending on your book, it may make more sense for you to self-publish and use a print-on-demand service like Lulu, or Amazon’s CreateSpace, but for the first editions of All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows, we were on a mission to create a limited release hardcover that felt unique and had character, an artifact that Ramez’s family, friends, and readers could treasure forever. Whether you have written a book and are thinking about self-publishing, or if you are operating an independent publisher, I hope this clarifies some of the mystery behind bringing a book into the world.

As you may recall, we had a last minute print house swap, which led to some cover measurement readjustments. Now this was not only an issue we had to shovel onto our brave jacket designer, Jason Yocum, but I also had to retool the file for the foil stamping on the spine behind the jacket. Fortunately, we only went with a single hit of foil, but if you add stamping to the front cover, be mindful of additional costs.

Foil stamping on the book spine

While we’re on additional costs, are you ready for the big one? Our primary financial surprise came in the form of shipping charges for proofs. Due to some color matching issues, we had to get a second proof of the jacket. Two jacket proofs and one text proof cost a mere $5 less than we paid to ship the entire order of finished books! We were aware of the base price for proofs, but we did not know that the shipping would be expedited and the additional cost would be added to our invoice. If you’re on a budget and not crunched for time, you’d be wise to ask for more shipping options on your proofs.

Jacket Proofs
The difference is so slight, yet so critical!

Another thing to remember is that proofs are the very last line of defense, so do your side-by-side comparisons and knock out all those edits before you send those final files to the printers! We’ll be happy to take care of this for you—our rates are right there on our homepage. This is an important detail, because both printers and eBook converters will charge for additional edits, and those rates are nowhere near as reasonable as ours!

Digital editions are somewhat less complicated during these stages, but that doesn’t mean they require less attention. What’s that? Did I just hear you say, “But Josh, I’m not going to release an eBook?” Let me stop you right there. I don’t care how much of a physical book purist you are, you aren’t the one who will be buying all of your books (I hope), so offer eBooks to your readers. Still not convinced? Digital books are a necessity for a lot of people with disabilities, and are significantly cheaper, which is great for folks with limited incomes. Even if you’re a heartless bastard, you can’t deny that a bigger audience pool equals more potential readers, and why publish if you don’t want readers?

If that last part applies, maybe we can work on you being less of a heartless bastard in a future post…

Until then, BACK TO EBOOKS! There are several DIY options for eBook conversion, such as Calibre, but these programs are notorious for their steep learning curves, so don’t even click that link if you struggle with everyday apps. If you’re feeling bold and have a simple layout, Bookow has an automated eBook layout program that appears easier to navigate than most, but if you have any specific layout elements in mind, you’ll want some human input. Fortunately, you can get an eBook conversion done for as low as $200, just make sure you’re getting both .mobi and .epub formats. Remember Bookow? They offer custom formatting from $250, but ultimately we went with Bookmobile because of the relatively complex nature of poetry formatting. Hot tip—poetry eBook conversions cost more due to this complexity. Our eBooks came out slick thanks to Arna & the crew at Bookmobile, and I fully endorse both their work and their customer service!

As soon as you have a manuscript that’s ready to publish, it’s time to also start thinking about high-resolution file formatting for both print and digital. Once  you are in contact with your printer and eBook converter, start asking questions about files. If you’re not familiar with the deep and varied range of options available within PDF files, brace yourself, because both formats require specific types of PDFs with fonts embedded. Get measurements for EVERYTHING. Find out what file types each company needs for images and text. Our eBook cover had to be at least 300 dpi and a minimum height of 2560 pixels, so keep this in mind when you’re sourcing cover art as well! If you haven’t had any experience with digital design, you might be better off hiring someone to handle this for you.

At the very least, I absolutely recommend hiring a designer for the cover. This is one of the most discussed topics I’ve ever seen in the worlds of self and indie publishing, and while anyone can slap a title and author name on a stunning piece of art, that usually doesn’t make for a great book cover. Design as a trade has been so diminished by the wide availability of programs like Photoshop and even the MS Office Suite, that anyone who can navigate a computer thinks it’s as simple as stacking the required layers and making the text readable. I assure you, fellow do-it-yourselfer, that a trained designer has an understanding of how and why visual elements work that most of us couldn’t hope to grasp. Give them your money, it will absolutely help you sell books. The same suggestion applies to cover artwork. Self-publishing is plagued by bad book covers, and I’m willing to bet more than a few outstanding authors have missed their shot because despite what we’re taught, we judge books by their covers.

Are you forgetting anything?

Did you buy ISBN’s? You’ll need these before you can finish your cover and your title page, so get these early. You can only get them from Bowker and they’re not cheap. Buy a pack if you can, because your eBook will need its own number as well.

Did you get a barcode? There are lots of options out there, but I’ll mention Bookow again because we used their killer barcode generator. These barcodes meet all retailer requirements, are high-resolution, and the generator is free! Once I tested ours out, I made a donation because Steve at Bookow was super helpful when I inquired about poetry formatting, and this utility is just so good, you’ll feel like you’re stealing if you get these barcodes for free!

Want your book in the Library of Congress? Of course you do! You’ll need to submit some information to their website before you send your final files to your printer and digital converter, as your PCN number will go on the publication data page. It’s a little confusing, but read the instructions carefully and you’ll have it in no time.

There’s a lot to this process, so if you have any additional questions, I’m happy to answer them in the comments!

Now that you know all the details that made this book a reality, get a copy for yourself!

Buy direct from Bedlam Publishing
or
Buy on Amazon

Behind the Book: All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows by Ramez Qureshi (Part 1)

We at The LetterWorks were recently involved in the publication of the first book by Bedlam Publishing, an indie publisher and sister company to TLW. (Full disclosure: I’m the Editor-in-Chief over there!) That book is Ramez Qureshi’s All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows: Collected Poems, and I wanted to take this opportunity to discuss some of the behind-the-scenes action that we don’t often consider when reading, writing, or even editing these wondrous little artifacts we call books.

It all started with the pitch. Bedlam doesn’t typically consider book pitches, as we are a tiny, D.I.Y. operation with a budget equivalent to the contents of the space beneath your couch cushions. Under normal circumstances, we can’t afford the cost of printing … but this was no normal circumstance. Writer, modern thinker, and all around top-notch individual, Ali Eteraz (whom we published in the first issue of our digital art/lit magazine, Loud Zoo in 2014), reached out to us with a poet, a vision, and a budget. We were definitely interested, and once he told us about Ramez and sent us a selection of his work, we were on board.

Ramez Qureshi
Ramez Qureshi

Ramez Qureshi was an astounding person. Both brilliant and compassionate, he earned his master’s degree at the age of 19 from the University of Pennsylvania and tutored underprivileged children in the area while in school. He was an avid reader and loved the arts profoundly. In addition to poetry, he wrote and published several critiques of books and gallery shows. Shortly after his college graduation, he was diagnosed with bipolar schizoaffective disorder, and spent time in and out of institutions. Through his struggles, Ramez held tight to his love of poetry, and those closest to him have stated that poetry and the poets he befriended through his online and local communities kept him alive for a number of years. The world lost Ramez in March of 2001, a victim of suicide spurred by his illness.

Ramez’s family made attempts to publish his work over the years, and though progress was made, nothing quite panned out. When Ramez’s sister, Sofia,  met Ali, the gears began to turn once more. In the original plan, Ali was to act as the editor, making final decisions on selections and order, as well as writing the introduction. Unfortunately, just as the book was picking up steam, he was sidelined by personal projects and responsibilities, and had to walk away. After discussion with Ramez’s family, it was decided that we would proceed and I would take on a more active role. Nikki Moen and Catherine Foster (who pulls double-duty, working at Bedlam and The LetterWorks) jumped in to read through the thousands of pieces and start deciding which ones would make the cut.

At this point, Catherine’s role expanded into The LetterWorks territory, as Ramez’s family had a box of handwritten pieces that they wanted transcribed and considered for the collection as well. This box of poems doubled our pool, but Catherine worked dutifully and had them transcribed before we knew it! Attention: writers who love to compose longhand, we can help with those stacks of stories you don’t know what to do with!

As things started firming up, Nikki, Catherine, Sofia, and I went on a mission to find the perfect cover art. We scoured the web, reached out to artist friends, and passed images back and forth until we saw “Cosmic Love 1” by Artem Mirolevich on the fine art website saatchiart.com. When Sofia shared a dream she had had about an “art office” that was promoting an artist who used a parachute in his work, we knew we had it. Was it meant to be? Look at this cover and tell me it wasn’t!

All of Yesterday's Tomorrows cover
All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows cover

We hired the incomparable Jason Yocum to design the jacket, and he was a joy to work with, even when we had to switch print houses at the last minute, requiring all sorts of measurement adjustments. (Thanks ‘n’ sorry, Jason!)

Wait a minute, did you just say you switched print houses … at the last minute??

That is correct. After working out the numerous details of production with [NAME REDACTED], there was a sharp and inexplicable price increase. When I politely inquired about said increase, I was met with silence. Ghosted by the print shop … So, I went back to my bookshelf and noticed that some of the best looking tomes from small presses had come from Maple Press in York, Pennsylvania. I reached out, got a quote, and we were back in business!

I highly recommend Maple Press if you’re looking to produce a book that has more character than your average print-on-demand book. Ramez’s family wanted something that looked and felt special, so we opted for a short-run of hardcovers with heavy, off-white, recycled paper with rough edges; which Maple delivered exquisitely. They were easy to work with, always friendly and professional, and, well … look at these books!!

Once we had completed two rounds of voting on which poems were most likely to make a great collection, Sofia consulted Associate Professor of Literature and Visual Studies at NYU Abu Dhabi, Shamoon Zamir. Not only did he help with the final piece selection, he ultimately developed the thematic order of the book. He also made a strong case for the title poem, which we nearly left out. “All of Yesterday’s Tomorrows” (the poem) is a forty-plus page experimental behemoth that explores Jenny Holzer’s Truisms, a Marxism conference, the Popol Vuh, statements made at the end of relationships, and somehow, quite a bit more. Ramez himself described the piece as “a philosophical meditation on the dialectics of arts and politics.” You may understand our hesitation to include such an extensive, experimental piece, but of course Shamoon was correct. We placed it at the end of the book, and while it’s not a light read, it is certainly Ramez’s most ambitious work. It evokes a tangible movement, and while you may not know where it’s taking you, its pull is undeniable.

We had a table of contents. We had a cover. We thought we were close. We had no idea…

Check in next time for Part 2, in which I get detailed about the prepress process in hopes of helping prospective publishers avoid some of the headaches and financial missteps we faced! In the meantime, you can buy Ramez’s wonderful book in the special edition hardcover (includes free eBook!), or all digital formats!

Buy direct from Bedlam Publishing
or
Buy on Amazon