Grammar Matters by Melissa Heiselt

Language is constantly evolving. New words are rising up and taking the world by storm. “Google” is a verb in the dictionary and pronouns such as “they” are now an accepted gender-neutral third person singular option. Even spelling evolves as what was once okay is now also OK. Yet incorrect grammar, spelling, and punctuation can be as off-putting as bad breath on a first date. Especially in the world of online business (and who doesn’t do at least some portion of their business online anymore?) your primary contact with customers will come via the written word. Think only Grammar Nazis care about that stuff? Think again.

In 2017, Global Lingo conducted a study to see how much impact poor grammar and spelling would have on a business. The result? Fifty-nine percent of participants were less likely to patronize a company whose materials contained obvious errors. Obvious to whom? Well, over half of their prospective customers, clearly. Failing to fully vet marketing and communications shows a lack of attention to detail and professionalism, which leads customers to question the quality of the product or service at stake.

The folks at Grammarly proved that good grammar was a decent predictor of success; participants in their study who were promoted just four times in ten years made 45% more grammar errors than their counterparts who were promoted six to nine times in that same period. A 2014 study found that freelancers on eLance (now Upworks) with the fewest grammatical slip-ups on their profiles land higher-paying jobs than their competitors with flawed profiles.

It’s not just in corporate matters that grammar can be a problem. A pair of studies conducted by two linguistics professors found that 100% of the time, emails from strangers containing typos and common grammar mistakes resulted in a lower opinion of the email sender. Need a new housemate? Updating your profile on a dating site? Check your grammar. When it’s a friend or associate we may overlook substituting “their” for “they’re” but when it’s a first impression, it’s one of the few things we have to use in forming a judgment. The jury has spoken: Grammar matters.

So, spelling and punctuation are not your strong suit? Have someone with stellar word sense look things over. Grammarly is a popular option for people who want a filter for casual online communication, emails, twitter posts, and the like. Unfortunately, it can’t catch everything. You need an actual human to catch things like a wrong word (not just a misspelled one) or to edit for clarity. As Canadian communications giants Bell Aliant and Rogers Communications discovered, a misplaced comma can cost you two million dollars. For more enduring output that will be an official reflection of you or your company, think contracts, advertising brochures, web content and consider hiring an actual editor. The LetterWorks staff can look over everything from menus and marketing materials to a resume and cover letter. Truly. It’s worth it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *