Winter 2019 Submission Roundup!

Welcome to 2019! I don’t suppose anyone out there has resolved to publish a story this year, or more stories than last year? Anyone? I knew there’d be a few of you! Whether you’re here because of a resolution or not, if you’re looking to publish your work, you’ve come to the right place. Kick off the new year by getting your work into some of these respectable, and often paying publications!

As with our last roundup, I have not listed any magazines that charge a submission fee but don’t pay for acceptances. I may sound like a broken record, but perhaps this will become my catch phrase: “If they’re making money on your art, you should be making money on your art.”

Never, never, never, EVER submit anything without fully reading and understanding those submission guidelines first! If you’re unsure, ask for clarification via email. Some guidelines are very dense, but most editors would much rather respond to a quick email question than spend time reading something that doesn’t qualify for publication. Might I also recommend my post on making the cut with journal submissions as a fine companion for your approaching submission mission.

Godspeed! Read the guidelines!

Paying markets with no fees

Lackington’s: Outstanding speculative fiction, currently open for the “Voyages” themed issue. 1 cent CAD per word. This was featured in our last roundup and is still open, so assemble your best voyage ASAP! https://lackingtons.com/submissions/

Apex Magazine: Apex is a long-time standout in genre fiction. They publish sci-fi, fantasy, horror, speculative fiction, and genre-defying work by some of the best writers out there. Payment is $.06 per word, and there’s a chance that they’ll podcast your piece for an additional $.01 per word. There’s no specified deadline, so they will likely close soon! https://www.apex-magazine.com/submission-guidelines/

Rattle: This well-known poetry magazine is looking for poems that first appeared on Instagram, and they’re paying $100 per piece! This opportunity ends on January 15th, so get on this one soon! https://rattle.submittable.com/submit/28742/instagram-poets

Great Weather for MEDIA: Accepting “edgy, fearless, and experimental” pieces for it’s annual anthology. Contributors earn $10 and 1 contributor copy, open until January 15thhttps://greatweatherformedia.submittable.com/submit

Ruminate: A beautiful publication rooted in healing contemplation, Ruminate pays $20 per page of poetry up to $80, $20 per 400 words of prose, and $20 for visual art. Submission cycles vary, so get your poetry in by January 15th and non-fiction by May 31st. Fiction submissions will be open from February 19th-August 14thhttps://www.ruminatemagazine.com/pages/submissions

Prairie Fire: Traditionally styled, but creatively energized, Prairie Fire is looking for work-related stories for their “Work Matters” issue. Fiction and non-fiction earn $.10 per word up to $250, $40 per poem. Deadline: January 18thhttp://www.prairiefire.ca/submit/submission-guidelines/current-submission-calls/call-for-submissions-work-matters/

FIYAH: If you’re not familiar with this magazine of Black speculative fiction, get familiar, because these folks are not here to mess around! FIYAH pays $150 for short stories, $300 for novelettes, and $50 for poetry. The theme for this issue is “Hair” and submissions close on January 31sthttps://www.fiyahlitmag.com/submissions/

Event: One of Canada’s finest! Paying $30 per page up to $500 of prose, and $35 per page of poetry up to $500. Deadline: January 31st. https://www.eventmagazine.ca/submit/

Augur Magazine: This newer Canadian magazine has hit the ground running. They’re looking for pieces that defy easy genre categorization, but lean towards literary speculative fiction. Their target is to publish 75% Canadian and Indigenous artists, so while all are welcome to submit, local creators will have some preference. $.06 cents per word for short fiction, $60 for flash, and $40 per poem—all payment in CAD. Deadline January 31st http://www.augurmag.com/submissions/

Room: Another Canadian gem, this time Room is looking for a new take on “Sports” for their upcoming themed issue. Accepted pieces will earn $50-150 CAD depending on length. Submissions open until January 31sthttp://roommagazine.com/submit

Arc: Long-running poetry journal offering up $50 per page plus a contributor copy. Get your lines in by January 31sthttp://arcpoetry.ca/submit/

Ninth Letter: This University of Illinois publication is a standout in the sea of university journals. The pieces and layout design are always top-notch, and they publish a wide variety of work. The print edition pays $25 per printed page up to $150, plus two contributor copies. Submissions of fiction, poetry, and essays accepted by February 28thhttps://ninthletteronline.submittable.com/submit

Zyzzyva: Beautiful, reputable magazine. No online submissions, snail mail only! Token to semi-pro rates. Open January 7th-May 31st. http://www.zyzzyva.org/about/submissions/

The Deaf Poets Society: Not to be biased, but this might be my favorite new magazine! This digital multimedia platform publishes deaf and disabled artists, and is. They’re running on donations, so payment amounts depend on gifts from fans and donors. No submission deadlineshttps://www.deafpoetssociety.com/submit/

The Masters Review: This is a big time mag known for its massive contests, but now they’re open year round and paying $.10 per word up to $200 for fiction and non-fiction by writers who have yet to release a book-length work. This is a great jump start for you up-and-comers! https://themastersreview.submittable.com/submit/26106/new-voices-free

Pseudopod: Hear your fiction in podcast form! Very cool and forward-thinking fiction podcast looking for dark, weird fiction. 6 cents per word, Rolling deadlinehttp://pseudopod.org/submissions/

Nashville Review: One of only a handful of university journals on this list, traditional format with a refreshing approach. $25 per poem, $100 for prose. Now accepting translations! January 31st deadline. https://as.vanderbilt.edu/nashvillereview/contact/submit

One Story: Exactly like it sounds, a slick magazine featuring a single piece of fiction! Acceptance gets you $500 and 25 contributor copies, so have your best, most polished work ready for this one. Open from January 15th-May 31st. https://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit&pubcode=os

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet: This is the best lit mag you’ve (probably) never read! A true gem by the fine folks at Small Beer Press. No online submissions—snail mail only! 3 cents per word with a $25 minimum for fiction, $10 per poem, plus two contributor copies and a discount on additional issues. http://smallbeerpress.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Beneath Ceaseless Skies: They publish a very specific style of fantasy, but they do it very well. Now publishing stories up to 15,000 words at 6 cents per word, rolling submissions. http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/submissions/

Smokelong Quarterly: Flash fiction only, no deadlines. $25 per story. http://www.smokelong.com/submissions/guidelines/

No fee, no pay

Ink & Nebula: Interesting new digital poetry mag that highlights established poets on the “Ink” side, and features previously unpublished poets on the “Nebula” side. Submit up to 5 pieces by February 1sthttp://inkandnebula.com/submissions.html

The Account: Here’s a magazine carving its own space into the digital realm! The Account is looking to explore the relationship between the words on the page, and the ideas that led the writer to those words. Each submission must be accompanied by an account of writing that submission (Read the guidelines!!!). Deadline: March 1sthttps://theaccountmagazine.com/guidelines

Crab Fat Magazine: Crab Fat might just be the hardest working non-paying magazine going. They consistently put out solid issues, plus a yearly print anthology. This is a great place cut your teeth in the lit world with the best new talents! Rolling deadlinehttp://crabfatmagazine.com/

Always Crashing: Looking for something different? You found it! Always Crashing is an ever-mutating multimedia entity that also publishes a print issue annually. No deadline listed. https://www.alwayscrashing.com/submissions/

The Wax Paper: A quarterly print broadsheet style publication inspired by “Studs” Terkel? Of course that sounds awesome! Submit by June 30th, accepted artists will get a lifetime subscription. https://thewaxpaper.com/submissions/

Asymptote: Bring your translations here! Rolling deadlinehttps://www.asymptotejournal.com/submit/

Small fee, paid publication

Witness: Brought to you by the Black Mountain Institute (who also publish The Believer), Witness is looking for innovative poetry, prose, and photography with a unique perspective. Payment is $25 for every 1,500 words, and $25 per poem and they charge a $3 Submittable fee. Submissions are open from January 15th-March 1st. https://witness.blackmountaininstitute.org/submit/

Zizzle: Flash fiction that appeals to all ages. $100 per piece with a $3 submission fee. Accepting submissions year-round. http://zizzlelit.com/submit/

Ploughshares: You’ve heard of this one, right? $3 fee, $45 per printed page with a $90 minimum and a $450 max. Deadline: January 15th. https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Driftwood: A fairly young journal coming into its own. Fees from $2.99, pays $15 per poem, $75 for fiction. Rolling deadline. https://www.driftwoodpress.net/submit

There are more lit mags than I could ever hope to list here, so if there’s one you like that’s open for subs, drop it in the comments! And read the damn submission guidelines!!!

Fall 2018 Submission Roundup!

Hello, word-slingers! Are you ready to get your work out there to the unprepared populace? If you answered with any apprehension, we’re here for you—check our homepage for editing services and rates, and we’ll help you get your work into such good shape that you’ll be itching to send it out!

For those of you who are ready, those of you who just shouted “YES!” at your computer or mobile device, you’re in luck, as I’ve assembled and organized a collection of the most promising opportunities going. Some of these deadlines are coming up quick, so be vigilant. Please note that I have not listed any magazines that charge a submission fee but don’t pay for acceptances. I strongly suggest you avoid venues using this practice. If they’re making money on your art, you should be making money on your art.

Before you begin, and I can’t stress this enough, be sure to carefully read all guidelines before submitting anywhere! You may also be interested in reading my post on making the cut with journal submissions before you proceed.

Happy submitting, and don’t forget to read the guidelines!

Paying markets with no fees

Apex: “Do Not Go Quietly” socially conscious SFF anthology by some of the hardest working folks in genre fiction! 6 cents per word. Deadline: September 19th. https://apexbookcompany.moksha.io/publication/do-not-go-quietly/guidelines

Electric Literature: These icons of modern lit are open for a couple of weeks in two categories, so act fast! $100 total for selected poetry and graphic narrative work. Deadline September 20th. An essay on the book (or other narrative media) that almost killed you pays $60, with a deadline of September 21st. https://electricliterature.submittable.com/submit

The Puritan: Sleek Canadian magazine offering $20 per poem, $75 for fiction, $100 per essay, review, or interview. Deadline: September 25th. https://puritan-magazine.submittable.com/submit

Cosmic Roots & Eldritch Shores: Interesting and fun SFF journal, paying 6 cents per word. Submissions open September 21-28. https://cosmicrootsandeldritchshores.com/submissions/

Life After All: “An apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic/pastoral apocalyptic LGBTQIA+ anthology.” $150 per piece, open until September 30th. https://www.lessthanthreepress.com/anthology-submissions/

Pseudopod: Hear your fiction in podcast form in the “Artemis Rising” horror event for women only! Very cool and forward-thinking fiction podcast. 6 cents per word, September 30th deadline. http://pseudopod.org/2018/08/15/artemis-rising-5/#more-7276

Nashville Review: One of only a handful of university journals on this list, traditional format with a refreshing approach. $25 per poem, $100 for prose. Now accepting translations! September 30th deadline. https://as.vanderbilt.edu/nashvillereview/contact/submit

Event: One of Canada’s finest! $30 per page of prose, $35 per page of poetry. Deadline: September 30th. https://www.eventmagazine.ca/submit/

Consequence: A magazine with a special  interest in the “culture and consequences of war.” $25 per page of poetry, $10 per prose page, $15 per translated page. Deadline: September 30th. http://www.consequencemagazine.org/submit/

Bubble Off Plumb: An off-kilter anthology of the odd and unsettling. 3 cents per word + royalty share. Deadline: September 30th. https://feralcatpublishers.com/bubble-off-plumb-anthology

Spoon Knife 4: A Neurodivergent Guide to Spacetime: Anthology on time and space “with themes of neurodivergence, queerness, and/or the intersections of neurodivergence and queerness.” 1 cent per word. Deadline: September 30th. http://autpress.com/2018/01/call-for-submissions-spoon-knife-4/

Tin House: One of the big ones, and they’ve extended their submission window to October 15th! Rates start at $50 for poetry and $200 for prose. https://tinhouse.submittable.com/submit

Fireside Fiction: One of the best magazines going! Top-scale pay, short reading periods. $100 per poem, open October 24-31. 12.5 cents per word for fiction, open December 15-31. https://firesidefiction.com/submissions

One Story: Exactly like it sounds, a slick magazine featuring a single piece of fiction! Acceptance gets you $500 and 25 contributor copies, so have your best, most polished work ready for this one. Deadline: November 14th. https://www.one-story.com/index.php?page=submit&pubcode=os

Zyzzyva: Beautiful, reputable magazine. No online submissions, snail mail only! Token to semi-pro rates. Deadline: November 19th. http://www.zyzzyva.org/about/submissions/

Lackington’s: Outstanding speculative fiction, opens December 2018 for “Voyages” themed issue. 1 cent CAD per word. https://lackingtons.com/submissions/

Zizzle: Flash fiction that appeals to all ages. $100 per piece. December 31st deadline. http://zizzlelit.com/submit/

Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet: A true gem by the fine folks at Small Beer Press! No online submissions—snail mail only! 3 cents per word for fiction, $10 per poem. http://smallbeerpress.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Beneath Ceaseless Skies: They publish a very specific style of fantasy, but they do it very well. 6 cents per word, rolling submissions. http://www.beneath-ceaseless-skies.com/submissions/

Smokelong Quarterly: Flash fiction only, no deadlines. $25 per story. http://www.smokelong.com/submissions/guidelines/

No fee, no pay

Bridge: Cool opportunity for young writers and artists, as this magazine is only open only to contributors between the ages of 14 & 24. Contributor copy payment, deadline: September 30th. https://bridgebluffton.submittable.com/submit

Feels Blind Literary: Inaugural issue, looks promising, but they need exceptional work to put them on the map! Deadline: October 1st. https://www.feelsblindliterary.com/submissions

Capulet: Another opportunity for the young folks, open to women ages 15-29. October 20th deadline. http://capuletmag.com/submit/

Clockhouse: “An eclectic conversation about the work-in-progress of life.” Payment is a contributor copy, but it’s likely to be a good one. Deadline: December 1. http://clockhouse.net/main/submit/

Litro: Wide-ranging UK journal open for various themed issues—check specific guidelines posted for each one! https://www.litro.co.uk/submit/

Storm Cellar: One of the more engaging indie publications currently out there, rolling submission period. https://stormcellarquarterly.com/submit/

Loud Zoo: The socially conscious literary/arts journal from our sister company, Bedlam Publishing. Every accepted piece gets a complimentary edit from The LetterWorks! Deadline: September 30th, not accepting poetry this cycle. http://www.bedlampublishing.com/submissions.html

Small fee, paid publication

Nimrod: Ambitious journal open for a themed issue on the Middle East and North Africa. $3 fee, $10 per page up to $200. Deadline: December 1st. https://nimrod.utulsa.edu/manuscripts.html

Ploughshares: You’ve heard of this one, right? $3 fee, $45 per printed page with a $90 minimum and a $450 max. Deadline: January 15th. https://www.pshares.org/submit/journal/guidelines

Driftwood: A fairly young journal coming into its own. Fees from $2.99, pays $15 per poem, $75 for fiction. Rolling deadline. https://www.driftwoodpress.net/submit

 

See anything I missed that deserves a mention? Drop it in the comments! And read the damn submission guidelines!!!

What Published Authors Never Tell You About Writing A Cover Letter by Catherine Foster

As a short story author, I am proud to tell people that I have over seventy published titles to my credit. This is one of the first things that I list about myself when I am crafting a blurb about my accomplishments or when I need to write up a paragraph detailing my successes. As authors, we can craft what truth to write on the page to suit our needs. For instance, it is an equal truth but far less flattering to mention that for every story on the list that met with an approval letter, I first met with at least four rejections. Sometimes I had ten or fifteen dismissals before I saw that coveted acceptance finally come my way. In fact, it might be fairer to write next to my name: suffered 703 kicks in the teeth, but who wants to trumpet their failures? It’s far better to tell about the ones that people liked than the ones they didn’t, wouldn’t you agree?

Let’s be honest: you’re going to get some rejections along the way. It’s to be expected, but you’re strong and you can handle it. You can mitigate your risk of receiving that dreaded rejection letter by following a few simple rules:

–When you are ready, having your piece thoroughly edited and proofread.

No submissions editor wants to read a story by an author that couldn’t be bothered to properly punctuate or spell correctly. If you don’t care, why should they?

–Reading and respecting ALL submission guidelines.

This can be difficult, since each place has varying, possibly circuitous, rules that sometimes seemed designed to test your patience and understanding of your computer’s advanced formatting tools. But a word to the wary: many places will not even read your submission if you don’t follow their rules very closely. It is wise to spend time reading the fine print, and I especially recommend becoming familiar with William Shunn’s excellent guide to formatting, which is considered by most to be the gold standard when there is any doubt about the rules.

Choosing wisely about where to submit.

You may not have time to read the back issues of every literary magazine between The Albuquerque Revue and Zephyrhills Weekly, but it is your responsibility to be at least a little familiar with where you are submitting. It doesn’t make sense to submit a horror story to a romance-based magazine or a conservative political editorial to a nonbinary review. These types of mistakes are sure to get you a rejection, and not a nice one. A little bit of research beforehand can save you a lot of headache in the long run. Or it can make your day!

–Having a great submission letter.

This is your introduction and your chance to stand out from the pack.

We’re going to focus on the last item. The key to having your first story accepted instead of brushed off can be as simple as your submission letter. If I had known that when I was beginning my career, I may be more able to write now suffered only 201 kicks in the teeth and saved myself a few heartaches, but perhaps you can learn easier than I did. A well-written submission letter is important because it gives a lot of information about you in an organized manner. Many contributors skip this step, especially if they are submitting through an online management software system such as Submittable that has its own place for the questions that would normally be included in a cover letter. This is a mistake for several reasons, this first and most important is that your information will be stored with that system, but you want to be known as professional. Your submission and that spot in the magazine or with the publishing house is similar to a job to which you are applying. If you take yourself seriously and with respect, the editors will see that and take notice. Filling out an online form is the minimum effort required, and it shows. Having a well-crafted submission letter speaks volumes about you, and you want to leave people with the best impression of yourself and your work that you possibly can.

It is all right to create your letter beforehand and tweak it to fit the different places you are submitting to. This is known as a form letter. The danger in this is that you must be very careful to look over your letter before you send it out. You don’t want any embarrassing mistakes because you sent the wrong date or the wrong salutation at the top. So be aware of the pitfalls of the form letter.

The submission letter should start with your name, address, telephone number and e-mail address at the top left corner, left-justified. Must you give this information? Sometimes not, but it is easier to remove it in subsequent drafts than to keep adding it every time you want to send the letter. Traditional cover letters usually include that information, and any reputable establishment will not sell or use personal information from submissions. If you choose not to include this information, you can always delete it later.

The next step is to choose a greeting. Because it is a form letter, it is advisable to choose something that does not specify gender or is inclusive to both. “To Whom It May Concern,” “Dear Sir or Madam,” etc.

The opening paragraph is where you introduce yourself. Say hello and state the the name of your story. This is where you need to establish a connection, no matter how tenuous: “I found your listing for calls in New Pages.” “I read Glimmer Train.” “I read a story by your editor.” Here is where you mention how know about them or how you heard about their company and why you think your story is a good fit. This paragraph should not be more than three or four sentences. This is not the time to discuss plot details or to explain anything. This is a quick, easy, paragraph establishing introductions and connections and should not be overly dense.

The next paragraph is your biography. It should be about seventy-five to a hundred words, or no more than four sentences. This is where you state some accomplishments germane to the industry. You may list a single website and no more than three published titles. If you list everything you have ever written, you risk boring the editor and they will skip over your whole letter. If you are new and just getting started, don’t fret. You can use general terms when talking about your accomplishments: “I’ve been writing for 5 years.” “I have always loved reading and have decided to pursue writing as my dream.” Many, many publishers passionately support new and emerging writers, so don’t be intimidated  when you’re just starting out!

The last section is where you close it out and tie everything together. Thank the editors for taking the time to read your work. Say something gracious about the process or something personal but genuine. If nothing seems to fit, that’s okay. This section should be short, but not more than three sentences at most.

For your closing, pick something that suits you but is not too trendy. “Sincerely,” “Respectfully,” “Best wishes,” are all good choices and something in that vein would serve you well. You want to write your name, and underneath that you may also put your pen name in parentheses, if you are using one.

This will be a good, solid submissions letter that will serve you all the years that you will be working with the publishing industry. It can be modified easily: you can add to your growing list of accomplishments in your biographical section, add in word count if the site specifies it, give a little blurb about the plot if they require it, and so on and so forth. The most important thing is that you remember to read all of the requirements for each site so that you can make the changes to your letter that you need to.

Rejection doesn’t come easy to anyone, but being prepared will help you avoid a majority of those nasty stings. This guide to submissions letters is your first step in great preparation. Good luck out there, and happy submitting!